Loneliness – ways to improve your social relationships

Researchers have been investigating the impact of loneliness and how connecting with people can positively improve our mental health, wellbeing, and physical health. For some of us, this may be easy, but for others, social relationships and situations can leave us feeling a little awkward. Here’s some advice on how to improve your social relationships. 

Loneliness 

Loneliness is not about the number of friends you have but rather about the quality of your connections. It’s about feeling genuinely connected to the people in your life and having meaningful and supportive relationships. 

Research has shown that connecting with others can positively impact our mental health, wellbeing, and physical health. While some people find connecting and building meaningful relationships easy, others may find social situations and relationships challenging and awkward. This can make it difficult to form the connections we crave, leading to feelings of loneliness.  

 

Strategies to improve your social relationships 

If you’re seeking to enhance your social connections and combat loneliness, consider implementing the following strategies: 

 

Don’t overthink   

Instead of dwelling on your anxieties or overthinking potential social situations, shift your focus to the person you’re engaging with and the conversation at hand. Mindfulness techniques, such as deep breathing exercises or positive self-talk, can help you manage overthinking and approach social situations with a more relaxed and open mindset. 

 

Actively listen 

Active listening demonstrates your attentiveness and engagement in conversations. Listen attentively, ask open-ended questions, and provide positive prompts like “I see” or “Tell me more.” Avoid interrupting the speaker and maintain eye contact to convey your genuine interest. 

 

Don’t get distracted 

Social interactions require your undivided attention. Minimise distractions by putting away your phone and silencing notifications. This allows you to fully engage in the conversation. 

 

Embrace small talk 

Small talk, often perceived as superficial, can be a valuable tool for building rapport and finding common ground. Engage in casual conversations about shared interests, current events, sports, or even the weather. These interactions can open doors to more meaningful connections. 

 

Say their name 

Addressing someone by their name adds a personal touch to conversations and demonstrates that you care. If you forget a name, don’t stress (it happens); politely ask for a reminder rather than pretending to know it. 

 

Prepare  

When anticipating specific social situations prepare some conversation starters or questions in advance. This can help you feel more confident and prepared and reduce your nervousness. 

 

Relax 

Try mindfulness or relaxation techniques before the event if social situations make you anxious or nervous. Deep breathing exercises, progressive muscle relaxation, or meditation can help calm your nerves. 

 

Accept change 

Friendships and relationships evolve over time. It’s natural for connections to grow stronger or weaker over the years. Accept that change is a normal part of social dynamics and focus on nurturing the relationships that bring you joy and fulfilment. 

 

Participate 

Volunteering activities or community events can help you connect with people with similar interests and values. These shared experiences can create a sense of belonging and expand your social network. 

 

Quality over quantity 

The quality of your social relationships is more important than the quantity. Focus on cultivating meaningful connections with individuals who bring value and positivity to your life. Take the time to appreciate and enjoy the experience of connecting with people. 

 

Improving your social relationships takes time. By implementing some of these tips and tailoring them to your specific needs and social situations, you can work to enhance your connections, combat loneliness, and enjoy the benefits of meaningful relationships. 

 

If you are struggling and need to talk to a counsellor, SuicideLine Victoria is free and open 24/7. Call us on 1300 651 251 or click on the chat button on the right for online counselling.  

If it is an emergency, dial 000

 

 

 

 

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